Ask E. Jean - Tormented? Driven Witless? Whipsawed by confusion?

Advice Vixens

Bookworm time...what book are you currently reading?

I'm rereading Deepak Chopra's "The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire."

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    I love all his books Sheela. Great choice!

    I'm reading Daniel Pink's "A Whole New Mind".

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    "Clapton"....by Eric Clapton.

    EDIT: I read "Wonderful Tonight" by Patti Boyd and then had to read "Clapton" as a companion book. I read nonfiction only, and really enjoy autobiographies.

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    "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe
    and one of many Calvin and Hobbes collections.

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    There's a method to my madness. I'm writing all these down.

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    Does everyone read regularly?

    I don't. I hate fiction. I research tons of stuff online but that is the extent of my reading. I don't even read the newspaper.

    Ok, I read AdviceVixens. Does that count?

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    I'm just on my way to the bookstore to get Nora Vincent's new book, Voluntary Madness. She wrote a book about spending a year as a man and I worried for her: by the end she was having a breakdown. Well, now her new book is out and it, in part chronicles that breakdown and the state of mental health hospitals on this country. Can't wait!

    Also in the middle of The Man of My Dreams by Curtis Sittenfield, author of Prep (not so great so far), and as usual, knee deep in the vintage beauty books. Right now, The Beautiful People's Body Book, by Luciana Avedon.

    Oh AND my mother gave my My Lobotomy (something like that) over the holiday. A Memoir by a man who was lobotomized, really without cause. I'm reading that too.

    I should calm down.

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    I am reading Michael Connolly's The Brass Verdict.

    I love thrillers.

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    Bonnie wrote: I'm just on my way to the bookstore to get Nora Vincent's new book, Voluntary Madness. She wrote a book about spending a year as a man and I worried for her: by the end she was having a breakdown. Well, now her new book is out and it, in part chronicles that breakdown and the state of mental health hospitals on this country. Can't wait! Also in the middle of The Man of My Dreams by Curtis Sittenfield, author of Prep (not so great so far), and as usual, knee deep in the vintage beauty books. Right now, The Beautiful People's Body Book, by Luciana Avedon. Oh AND my mother gave my My Lobotomy (something like that) over the holiday. A Memoir by a man who was lobotomized, really without cause. I'm reading that too. I should calm down.

    Or leap into one of Juliet's horror/Gothic novels. One or the other.

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    Brandi wrote: Does everyone read regularly? I don't. I hate fiction. I research tons of stuff online but that is the extent of my reading. I don't even read the newspaper. Ok, I read AdviceVixens. Does that count?

    I read like a madwoman always have. It's almost compulsive at times. I do go through phases where I can't quite get lost in a book, and those are the times I go through magazines like kindling.


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    Bonnie wrote: I'm just on my way to the bookstore to get Nora Vincent's new book, Voluntary Madness. She wrote a book about spending a year as a man and I worried for her: by the end she was having a breakdown. Well, now her new book is out and it, in part chronicles that breakdown and the state of mental health hospitals on this country. Can't wait! Also in the middle of The Man of My Dreams by Curtis Sittenfield, author of Prep (not so great so far), and as usual, knee deep in the vintage beauty books. Right now, The Beautiful People's Body Book, by Luciana Avedon. Oh AND my mother gave my My Lobotomy (something like that) over the holiday. A Memoir by a man who was lobotomized, really without cause. I'm reading that too. I should calm down.

    Naw, Bonnie, you go! I have serious book envy now.

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    Brian wrote: "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe and one of many Calvin and Hobbes collections.

    My boyfriend was just telling me about Things Fall Apart last night! He said it changed his life.

    I am currently reading I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough and Doggone it, People Like Me: Daily affirmations by Stuart Smalley. It's a novel under the guise of a self-help book written by Al Franken and it's hilarious, and even a little sad at times. I found it at the thrift store for thirty cents. That was thirty cents well spent.

    Next I'm going to start The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I've never read anything by her, and I've been meaning to for years.

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    Brandi wrote: Does everyone read regularly? I don't. I hate fiction. I research tons of stuff online but that is the extent of my reading. I don't even read the newspaper. Ok, I read AdviceVixens. Does that count?

    Yes it counts. And to vouch for Bonnie -- she DID read Twilight in 3 hours during a Thanksgiving family gathering!

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    I'm reading "Madness" a Bipolar Life by Marya Hornbacher.

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    Okay now I know why Vixens and Vixmen are so together. Reading results in ready minds.

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    I'm currently resisting the peer pressure to read the "Twilight" series, and instead opted for a grittier vampire drama "Southern Vampire Mysteries" upon which the HBO show True Blood is based.


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    Brandi wrote: Does everyone read regularly? I don't. I hate fiction. I research tons of stuff online but that is the extent of my reading. I don't even read the newspaper. Ok, I read AdviceVixens. Does that count?

    I read mostly stuff online. I don't read fiction, either, but when I can I read all or what I can of the 57 news feeds I have bookmarked on my computer. I enjoy reading newspapers from all over the world. Read the People's China Daily....quite interesting, but it's a newspaper.

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    Samantha wrote: My boyfriend was just telling me about Things Fall Apart last night! He said it changed his life. I am currently reading I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough and Doggone it, People Like Me: Daily affirmations by Stuart Smalley. It's a novel under the guise of a self-help book written by Al Franken and it's hilarious, and even a little sad at times. I found it at the thrift store for thirty cents. That was thirty cents well spent. Next I'm going to start The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I've never read anything by her, and I've been meaning to for years.

    Chinua Achebe has a whole series of works that stem from "Things Fall Apart". They are all very good.

    But, what about Calvin and Hobbes? They're awesome.

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    Heather wrote: I'm currently resisting the peer pressure to read the "Twilight" series, and instead opted for a grittier vampire drama "Southern Vampire Mysteries" upon which the HBO show True Blood is based.

    You know, I saw the movie and I wasn't impressed with Twilight.

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    I'm always reading three books at any given time. If I get bored with a book I always have a back-up. There's nothing worse than a bad read - except maybe a bad cup of coffee.

    Mary, I love autobiographies and biographies.

    I'm re-reading Eckert Tolle's : A new Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose.

    I just finished Wicked. (I want to see the play so my hubby got me the book - very sweet of him!). I was disappointed with his writing style but I still recommend it because it brings up some good questions on what is really evil or good and how nothing or no on is always as they seem on the surface.

    I also just finished "Anybody Out there?" by Marian Keyes.

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    Brian wrote: You know, I saw the movie and I wasn't impressed with Twilight.

    Chinua Achebe changed my life, my writing life and freed me to be more daring in my simplicity, to stay with my roots, trust them and to let them do the talking for me.




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    Brian wrote: You know, I saw the movie and I wasn't impressed with Twilight.

    True Blood is one my favorite shows. I haven't read the books yet but I may have to because the show doesn't come back until the summer! boo!

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    Brian wrote: Chinua Achebe has a whole series of works that stem from "Things Fall Apart". They are all very good. But, what about Calvin and Hobbes? They're awesome.

    The awesomeness of Calvin and Hobbes goes without saying:)

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    Francine wrote: I'm always reading three books at any given time. If I get bored with a book I always have a back-up. There's nothing worse than a bad read - except maybe a bad cup of coffee. Mary, I love autobiographies and biographies. I'm re-reading Eckert Tolle's : A new Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose. I just finished Wicked. (I want to see the play so my hubby got me the book - very sweet of him!). I was disappointed with his writing style but I still recommend it because it brings up some good questions on what is really evil or good and how nothing or no on is always as they seem on the surface. I also just finished "Anybody Out there?" by Marian Keyes.

    I found I lived each chapter of A New Earth as I read through it. I'd have the experience first ... and then see it written in the book.

    It was a truly amazing experience ...

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    Samantha wrote: The awesomeness of Calvin and Hobbes goes without saying:)

    I own every Calvin and Hobbes book ever made! Love them!

    Right now I am reading "One Hundred Years of Solitue" by Gabriel García Márquez, "Word Play" (about competitive Scrabble playing), the dictionary (i like words), and I'm in the middle of a couple of fiction series. I read voraciously! Books open your mind!

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    Grafelious wrote: I own every Calvin and Hobbes book ever made! Love them! Right now I am reading "One Hundred Years of Solitue" by Gabriel García Márquez, "Word Play" (about competitive Scrabble playing), the dictionary (i like words), and I'm in the middle of a couple of fiction series. I read voraciously! Books open your mind!

    GGM is the bomb for me! Mystical realism....

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    Samantha wrote: My boyfriend was just telling me about Things Fall Apart last night! He said it changed his life. I am currently reading I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough and Doggone it, People Like Me: Daily affirmations by Stuart Smalley. It's a novel under the guise of a self-help book written by Al Franken and it's hilarious, and even a little sad at times. I found it at the thrift store for thirty cents. That was thirty cents well spent. Next I'm going to start The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I've never read anything by her, and I've been meaning to for years.

    Samantha, I'm SUCH an Atwood fan! I'm not sure I'd start with "The Blind Assassin," though; it's sort of tough to get into. If you find it doesn't appeal, don't give up. Try one of her more accessible novels: "Alias Grace," "Lady Oracle," "Cat's Cradle," or the brilliantly cautionary "The Handmaid's Tale" (a billion times better than the movie).

    On the book pile right now I've got Calvin Trillin's memoir about his late wife, "About Alice"; John Hodgman's "More Information Than You Require"; Bob Harris's "Who Hates Whom: Well-Armed Fanatics, Intractable Conflicts, and Various Things Blowing Up - A Woefully Incomplete Guide." (I'm on a non-fiction kick right now.)

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    Bodhi, it's a fascinating subject. I recommend Natalie Angier's "Woman: An Intimate Geography." Her writing style can be a little cutesy, but the research is rock-solid and quite scholarly. It covers TONS of surprising information about human and animal sexual behavior.

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    I am constantly reading. Right now, I'm actually rereading "Tropic of Cancer" by Henry Miller and "We the Living" by Ayn Rand.

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    Perfect sense, Bodhi.

    Stephen King reads (on a slow year) about 50+ books per year. I agree with him in saying that if you don't have time to read, you don't have time to write. They go hand in hand.

    I am blown away by the impressive reading list from all of you!

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    Sheela wrote: Perfect sense, Bodhi. Stephen King reads (on a slow year) about 50+ books per year. I agree with him in saying that if you don't have time to read, you don't have time to write. They go hand in hand. I am blown away by the impressive reading list from all of you!

    I agree! A writer who doesn't read makes as much sense as a cook who doesn't eat-- neither is likely to produce something you'd want to consume.

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    Aunt Jenny wrote: I agree! A writer who doesn't read makes as much sense as a cook who doesn't eat-- neither is likely to produce something you'd want to consume.

    Absolutely! And another thing King says which I agree and embrace is to read ONLY what turns you on as a writer. Get steeped in those works and watch your own language soar!

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    Sally G. wrote: I found I lived each chapter of A New Earth as I read through it. I'd have the experience first ... and then see it written in the book. It was a truly amazing experience ...

    I agree mostly...The first few chapters do not engage me but once he get's into the Ego information I'm hooked. My best friend and I read it when Oprah first featured it and I can say as much as people get down on her book club I would not have heard of this book and truly was life changing. I'm re-reading because I feel that I've allowed life's recent downers to suck knowledge out of my brain in the last few months and I need a refresher!

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    I am currently 'reading' "Guide to Literary Agents!"

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    Aunt Jenny wrote: I agree! A writer who doesn't read makes as much sense as a cook who doesn't eat-- neither is likely to produce something you'd want to consume.

    Oh I agree also! Interesting enough, Stephen King (along with Judy Blue (!) and Alice Walker) are the authors that made me want to write when I was in grade school.

    I will say one disclaimer though about what you read while you are writing though. When I was working on a story that had big romantic comedy elements I stayed away from chick Lit because I wanted my story to be fresh and not to seem like I'm copying anything. It was my first story in years that I worked on and finished. So that's what I need at the time to complete it.

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    Just finished "Drown" by Junot Diaz. A work of staggering genius (to say the least), yet totally free of literary pretense. Stunning.

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    "Founding Mothers" by Cokie Roberts

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    Chloe wrote: Just finished "Drown" by Junot Diaz. A work of staggering genius (to say the least), yet totally free of literary pretense. Stunning.

    Met him, Chloe, back in '98. I want to read his latest "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao." He is another author who just shakes the sense into me.


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    Simone de Beauvoir's "The Prime of Life", her autobiography. Fantastic. Also working on "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee."

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    Sheela wrote: Met him, Chloe, back in '98. I want to read his latest "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao." He is another author who just shakes the sense into me.

    JEALOUS!

    You'll love "Oscar Wao," Sheela...

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    "Tropic of Cancer" by Hentry Miller. DIRTY.

    "The Faith of a Writer" by Joyce Carol Oates. I'm so stoked - I'm going to see her speak tonight!

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    Carly wrote: I am constantly reading. Right now, I'm actually rereading "Tropic of Cancer" by Henry Miller and "We the Living" by Ayn Rand.

    We Are the Living is by far my favorite Ayn Rand book. I disagree with her entire world view, but damn if she isn't a fantastic novelist.

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    Kent wrote: Simone de Beauvoir's "The Prime of Life", her autobiography. Fantastic. Also working on "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee."

    Oh my god! Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is heartbreaking and I can never find it anywhere.

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    Samantha wrote: We Are the Living is by far my favorite Ayn Rand book. I disagree with her entire world view, but damn if she isn't a fantastic novelist.

    I agree. I totally disagree with everything about her, but We The Living is one of my favorites. In fact, friends of mine are in a band called We The Living after their love of that book. They wanted Atlas Shrugged but it was taken!

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    Sheela wrote: Met him, Chloe, back in '98. I want to read his latest "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao." He is another author who just shakes the sense into me.

    Did you meet him at a reading? I would love to hear him read some of his work.

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    fayeruz wrote: "Tropic of Cancer" by Hentry Miller. DIRTY. "The Faith of a Writer" by Joyce Carol Oates. I'm so stoked - I'm going to see her speak tonight!

    Wow, where?!

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    fayeruz wrote: "Tropic of Cancer" by Hentry Miller. DIRTY. "The Faith of a Writer" by Joyce Carol Oates. I'm so stoked - I'm going to see her speak tonight!

    I know! I love how dirty both "Tropic of Cancer" and "Tropic of Capricorn" are. I read them both in high school (what can I say, I've been a little twisted since I was a teenager) and loved them. I've found recently that I love to reread books I read back then and find whole new meanings in them.

    Besides, who doesn't love ExPatriots, sex, paris, and all the fun stuff in Henry Miller books?

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    Chloe wrote: Did you meet him at a reading? I would love to hear him read some of his work.

    I worked in public relations at a social service agency in New York and we had an event in the Bronx and he came out and passed out his book to the students there and I was able to shake his hand and get a copy, too. He was so quiet and humble, but as is with these great writers, you can feel the magnificence oozing off them.

    I MUST read Oscar Wao.

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    Sheela,

    Tom Wolfe is an oldie, but a goodie. I love anything by him.

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    I'm reading the final shooting script for On the Waterfront.

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    Kent wrote: Simone de Beauvoir's "The Prime of Life", her autobiography. Fantastic. Also working on "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee."

    I have a Simone de Beauvoir tattoo!

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    "Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. She is a great writer and I will read anything she writes. Anything.


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    Helena wrote: "Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. She is a great writer and I will read anything she writes. Anything.

    100% in agreement. She is amazing. So incredibly talented.

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    Helena wrote: "Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. She is a great writer and I will read anything she writes. Anything.

    I enjoyed "Namesake". A friend has told me that "Unaccustomed Earth" is good too - it's a collection of short stories. I haven't read that yet ...

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    Lindsay wrote: Sheela, Tom Wolfe is an oldie, but a goodie. I love anything by him.

    Yes! YES! Loooouuuuurrrrrvvvveee Tom Wolfe.

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    Team Of Rivals. The Political Genuis of Abraham Lincoln
    by Doris Kearns Goodwin.

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    Hi Sheela,

    I'm reading John Grisham's, "The Last Juror." He is one of my favorite authors and I am finding it interesting reading about Mississippi.

    Take Care,
    Kelli

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    Aunt Jenny wrote: I agree! A writer who doesn't read makes as much sense as a cook who doesn't eat-- neither is likely to produce something you'd want to consume.

    Does that mean they have to read all novels and only fiction in order to be a good, inspired writer?

    I hate fiction. I have no interest in writing fiction. Ev.er.

    I love to spend my time reading something that can teach me something. FOR ME, fiction doesn't teach me anything. Again, that's ME. It might be different for others.


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    Samantha wrote: Oh my god! Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is heartbreaking and I can never find it anywhere.

    Read "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" years ago and loved it.

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    Brandi wrote: Does that mean they have to read all novels and only fiction in order to be a good, inspired writer? I hate fiction. I have no interest in writing fiction. Ev.er. I love to spend my time reading something that can teach me something. FOR ME, fiction doesn't teach me anything. Again, that's ME. It might be different for others.

    Brandi,

    I read a ton of non-fiction.

    reply to Sheela
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    Brandi wrote: Does that mean they have to read all novels and only fiction in order to be a good, inspired writer? I hate fiction. I have no interest in writing fiction. Ev.er. I love to spend my time reading something that can teach me something. FOR ME, fiction doesn't teach me anything. Again, that's ME. It might be different for others.

    Good fiction teaches plenty. "All Quiet on the Western Front" taught the ridiculousness of war. "For Whom the Bell Tolls," the lesson of self-sacrifice, a similar message seen in the movie "Casablanca" by the way. "Always Outnumbered Always Outgunned" taught a lesson of the redemption of an evil soul for good. There are lessons, if one is teachable. But as you suggest, fiction is not for everyone.

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    Calvin wrote: Good fiction teaches plenty. "All Quiet on the Western Front" taught the ridiculousness of war. "For Whom the Bell Tolls," the lesson of self-sacrifice, a similar message seen in the movie "Casablanca" by the way. "Always Outnumbered Always Outgunned" taught a lesson of the redemption of an evil soul for good. There are lessons, if one is teachable. But as you suggest, fiction is not for everyone.

    There certainly are moral lessons in fiction, but not anything different than you can glean from other sources-- such as actual life experience (yourself or interacting with others) or other non-fiction works. I guess that was my point.


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    Brandi wrote: There certainly are moral lessons in fiction, but not anything different than you can glean from other sources-- such as actual life experience (yourself or interacting with others) or other non-fiction works. I guess that was my point.

    Quite true, Brandi. You make a good point, even if you did not make a distinction between a moral teaching and an intellectual one in your initial post. But wouldn't you say that lessons gleaned from a book are learned over a shorter period of time than those of a lifetime? For me, and it's quite alright if you have a different opinion, nonfiction reinforces what we already know while great fiction opens up learning at a deeper level.

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    Samantha wrote: We Are the Living is by far my favorite Ayn Rand book. I disagree with her entire world view, but damn if she isn't a fantastic novelist.

    True, she is one selfish but talented broad!

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    Helena wrote: "Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. She is a great writer and I will read anything she writes. Anything.

    OMG, see the movie too. Surprisingluy moving and perfect cast. Perfect.

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    Carly wrote: I am constantly reading. Right now, I'm actually rereading "Tropic of Cancer" by Henry Miller and "We the Living" by Ayn Rand.

    Hey, I'm reading "Tropic of Cancer" too! Any particular reason you're re-reading it?

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    Calvin wrote: Quite true, Brandi. You make a good point, even if you did not make a distinction between a moral teaching and an intellectual one in your initial post. But wouldn't you say that lessons gleaned from a book are learned over a shorter period of time than those of a lifetime? For me, and it's quite alright if you have a different opinion, nonfiction reinforces what we already know while great fiction opens up learning at a deeper level.

    You know... I'm not sure about that whole opening up a deeper learning thing...

    I don't read fiction. And I'm not the dumbest rock in the box. I've learnt' me a thin' or two ;)


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    fayeruz wrote: Hey, I'm reading "Tropic of Cancer" too! Any particular reason you're re-reading it?

    Hadn't read it since I was 17 and found it again while perusing my bookshelves at home. I like to reread books often. I commute every day so I get through at least 3 books a week, so I certainly have the time! I find that as I get older, I appreciate different themes in books I read while I was younger.

    Before my Henry Miller and Ayn Rand phase, I reread The Phantom Tollbooth, which was my favorite book in elementary school. I love how it's all about a land of letters and numbers!

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    "The Man Who Emptied Death Row: Governor George Ryan and the Politics of Crime"

    It is fascinating to see how so many years of political corruption came to be and to learn how much more was going on then we could have ever imagined.

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    Brandi wrote: You know... I'm not sure about that whole opening up a deeper learning thing... I don't read fiction. And I'm not the dumbest rock in the box. I've learnt' me a thin' or two ;)

    Dumb will never be used as a descriptor for you Brandi - that's for sure. We all experience books differently and we're all drawn to different genres for different reasons.

    I feel like Calvin with regards to fiction. To dwell in places you may not have imagined with people you'd love to meet (or be) and perhaps even see yourself, a life situation or a dream reflected back at you while there ~ it's magic.

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    I am reading an anthology called "The Best Buddhist Writing 2008."

    THe writing is so centering and inspiring.

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    Brandi wrote: You know... I'm not sure about that whole opening up a deeper learning thing... I don't read fiction. And I'm not the dumbest rock in the box. I've learnt' me a thin' or two ;)

    I'm sure you have, Brandi.

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    Brandi wrote: Does that mean they have to read all novels and only fiction in order to be a good, inspired writer? I hate fiction. I have no interest in writing fiction. Ev.er. I love to spend my time reading something that can teach me something. FOR ME, fiction doesn't teach me anything. Again, that's ME. It might be different for others.

    Heavens, NO! Writing is the effective use of language. A good journalist is a better writer than a bad novelist any day of the week, genre notwithstanding.

    I don't think an allergy to reading fiction indicates anything other than a very specific taste... unless the reader aspires to WRITE fiction, that is (and it doesn't sound like that's your plan, anyway). Forcing yourself to absorb "Anna Karenina" when you'd rather be gobbling up McCullough's "John Adams" would be a pointless exercise.

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    I read mostly nonfiction now. However, I do think that fiction has enormous value in telling us that matters of life and the heart are universal even if they play out differently in different times and cultures. Some themes just don't work in any other medium.

    I think the novel that sticks most in my life is Ford Maddox Ford's "The Good Soldier". They did it for television, and just didn't work as well. Just a riviting book as the man's view of his life changes as he puts the pieces together differently. I have found the same thing true as I reflect on some of the things that have happened to me. (But much more positive than what happened in the book.)

    I agree that Simone de Beauvoir is a must-read as is Henry Miller (you should also read Anias Nin for the other side of the story as they were lovers when Miller wrote his best work).

    I still read history and philosophy which were my undergrad degree. And of course business books to keep current. I read "Linked" recently.....fascinating about the interconnection of all us and how a critical mass forms opinion.

    I use "The Economist" to keep my mind sharp and stay current across a variety of fields. Don't read quite as completely as I should.

    However, after a day of working online, I want most to get outside so read a lot less now than when I spent two hours a day on the train.

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    Aunt Jenny wrote: Heavens, NO! Writing is the effective use of language. A good journalist is a better writer than a bad novelist any day of the week, genre notwithstanding. I don't think an allergy to reading fiction indicates anything other than a very specific taste... unless the reader aspires to WRITE fiction, that is (and it doesn't sound like that's your plan, anyway). Forcing yourself to absorb "Anna Karenina" when you'd rather be gobbling up McCullough's "John Adams" would be a pointless exercise.

    I think you should read both to be exposed to fiction and would advocate such. However, once you read one example, I wouldn't put you through the torture again.

    As an example, I was forced to read Andre Malraux when I was studying in Paris. Absolutely hated it and Man's Fate (La Condition Humaine) was one of the few books I couldn't finish.

    I came to the conclusion that this was not the great work the French thought it was (he was Minister of Culture at the time) but that he turned out to be right about China. (I also don't think that Hemingway was as great as all that.)

    I once had the interesting experience of being the only person in the room at a dinner party who had read Jean Genet. The guest of honor was a Spanish poet who regarded him as his idol and the only "authentic man" he had ever known. I was revolted by the idea......I then saw this poet as a despicable man who ingratiated himself to people he regarded as fools and then spat on them.

    But I was the only one in the room who got his nasty joke. (I did let him know what I thought of Genet....disgusting man.) A surreal experience.......

    reply to Claire
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    "Tripping the Prom Queen" by Susan Shapiro Barash. It's a lot of stories and surveys that the author compiled about women and their constant rivalry with each other.

    On deck is "Catch 22." I picked it up years ago, but got caught up with work, and misplaced it. Now that I've found it again, I can relive the joy. Plus, I was only five chapters into the book.

    reply to Staci
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    I agree, Claire, that broad exposure is wonderful and optimal, but Brandi is positively ALLERGIC to fiction (it's come up in other threads). I would no more give her a copy of "Pride and Prejudice" than I would feed my guy a peanut butter sandwich-- they'd both go into anaphylactic shock and require immediate medical attention, and then everyone would be sorry I was invited.

    Love your Malraux/Genet stories. (Aren't the French funny about loving the repulsive?) Like you, I never got the Hemingway worship until I read his short stories, and then I came to appreciate him a bit.

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    "The Long Walk" ..is one of the most moving books I have ever encountered..written in the 40's ... it's about various prisoners of war from different countries who become comrades and try to save each other and themselves while travailing the world...
    don' know the author.... it's a hard book to find..........

    reply to Ann-Laura
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    Brandi wrote: Does that mean they have to read all novels and only fiction in order to be a good, inspired writer? I hate fiction. I have no interest in writing fiction. Ev.er. I love to spend my time reading something that can teach me something. FOR ME, fiction doesn't teach me anything. Again, that's ME. It might be different for others.

    Fiction taught me everything I know.

    reply to Bonnie
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    I'm finally getting to The Tipping Point and, like Brandi, I prefer non-fiction except for the classics.

    But I have a follow up question: What do you all think about these Kindles? Do you like reading online or do you prefer getting lost between the covers of an old-fashioned book?

    reply to Jodie
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    Guilty pleasure #33635. Have discovered a new, thick-book great-read author: Penny Vincenzi. The book is
    An Outrageous Affair.

    reply to jeannie`
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    I haven't read a book in so long I couldn't possibly know what I'd read. I'm talking 20 years ago. If I ever do get time to read, my favorite artists back then were Danielle Steele and Sidney Sheldon. Those are the types of books I used to love.

    reply to Lacy
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    Jodie wrote: I'm finally getting to The Tipping Point and, like Brandi, I prefer non-fiction except for the classics. But I have a follow up question: What do you all think about these Kindles? Do you like reading online or do you prefer getting lost between the covers of an old-fashioned book?

    I still prefer getting lost between the covers of a book. Holding it, smelling it ... for me, online reading is just not the same.

    reply to Sally G.
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    I'm reading "The Theory of Relativity & Other Essays" by Albert Einstein... for the fourth time. I'm beginning to understand it. And I stress the word "beginning".

    Oh, but Sheela, here's a book suggestion for you...

    "The Color Of Light" by William Goldman. It's a simple, average-sized novel of little importance. But it's a great read and it will move you. It's out of print. But you can find used copies on Amazon for a buck.

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    I'm reading "Notes on the State of Virginia" by Thomas Jefferson.

    This book was written in 1781 and it cost $22 in 2008.

    The man's a genious. Good book so far.


    reply to J. Cole
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    Watership Down - Richard Adams - according to the St Louis Post-Dispatch "Astonishing..Everyone who can read English should read it". Well, I read English. And I'm very obedient.

    Just finished 2 books last week - The Kite Runner (AWESOME!!) and Confessions of a Shopaholic, which was actually pretty cute and funny. I'm looking forward to the movie.

    reply to Keren
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    Jodie wrote: I'm finally getting to The Tipping Point and, like Brandi, I prefer non-fiction except for the classics. But I have a follow up question: What do you all think about these Kindles? Do you like reading online or do you prefer getting lost between the covers of an old-fashioned book?

    Would LOVE a Kindle!

    reply to Sheela
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    Galanty wrote: I'm reading "The Theory of Relativity & Other Essays" by Albert Einstein... for the fourth time. I'm beginning to understand it. And I stress the word "beginning". Oh, but Sheela, here's a book suggestion for you... "The Color Of Light" by William Goldman. It's a simple, average-sized novel of little importance. But it's a great read and it will move you. It's out of print. But you can find used copies on Amazon for a buck.

    Thank you!

    reply to Sheela
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    I'd love a Kindle too!!!!!! I saw one on the subway the other day. Looked great. But I'd probably go broke. You can download almost any book at any time at any place. WOW. Once I have more money and can increase my book budget I'll def get one!!!!!!!

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    Lacy wrote: I haven't read a book in so long I couldn't possibly know what I'd read. I'm talking 20 years ago. If I ever do get time to read, my favorite artists back then were Danielle Steele and Sidney Sheldon. Those are the types of books I used to love.

    Start reading again, Lacy. It will make a difference.

    reply to Sheela
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    Sheela wrote: Start reading again, Lacy. It will make a difference.

    Lacey-
    Listen to Sheela. It's time. Tell the vixens your interests and I'm sure we could put our prospective noggins together to find a great book for you to start reading again with.
    and Brandi-
    Any girl who loves Jimmy Choos is not a dumb rock. Books are an adventure!

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    GiGi wrote: I'm reading "Madness" a Bipolar Life by Marya Hornbacher.

    I'm reading "Twilight" by Stephenis Meyer ( I am a slow reader,ADD and sleepy)
    A tad adolescent but suits my mood!!!
    No wonder you're reading "Madness" you're immitating it in real life!!!
    Heidi (ya know,
    found you!!!)

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    GiGi wrote: I'm reading "Madness" a Bipolar Life by Marya Hornbacher.

    Look I joined!!! I hope you are learning how to deal with "the family" MADNESS...YOU SAID IT.save the book for me!

    reply to Heidi
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    GiGi wrote: I'm reading "Madness" a Bipolar Life by Marya Hornbacher.

    Look I joined!!! I hope you are learning how to deal with "the family" MADNESS...YOU SAID IT.save the book for me!

    reply to Heidi
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    Sheela wrote: Start reading again, Lacy. It will make a difference.

    Oh ,check out some James Patterson novels.Same genre with more of irony!

    reply to Heidi
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